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German war cemetery in the village of Saint Laurent-Blangy, north-east of the city of Arras.

The little village of St. Laurent-Blangy, in Northern France, saw heavy fighting in the years 1914 and 1915. The greater part of the village became frontline; the picture on the right shows a street after shellfire.

In 1917 the war came back to the village, with the Battle of Arras, and it came again in 1918, with the German spring offensive  and the cemeteries filled up, on both sides of the front.

A famous English poet died here: Isaac Rosenberg, who wrote Break of Day in the Trenches, was killed on patrol on April 1, 1918. He is buried in the Bailleul Road East Cemetery in St. Laurent-Blangy.

The Germans paid a high price in this area. Revealing is that many of the buried here have no known names. The German picture above shows a German war cemetery near Saint Laurent-Blangy. The picture was taken during the war.

The German cemetery is still there, although it looks quite different now. Nearly 32,000 German soldiers are buried here: 7,022 in graves, and 21,892 in mass graves.



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